5 Things You Can Do To Be a Mindful Traveler

Paris produce stand

Those who love to travel are quite often people seeking adventure. To enjoy new scenery, different cultures, interesting cuisine, breathtaking art and architecture, and so much more. Yes, traveling can be thrilling. But it’s also a gift to have the means to travel and something that should be not taken for granted. In this crucial time of protecting the planet, we need to be mindful when we travel as well as when at home. Read below how you can put being a mindful traveler into practice.

Paris 2 produce stand

5 Things You Can Do To Be A Mindful Traveler

  1. In hotels, practice sustainability. If you are staying in the same hotel room for a week or less, use the same bath towel and request that your sheets not be changed until you checkout.  Do your part to save water.
  2. In restaurants, order only the amount of food that you will eat. Food waste is huge!   If you want to try a variety of dishes, share with your dining companions. If you can bring leftovers back to your room for breakfast, do it! Approximately 1/3 of the food produced in the world for human consumption each year, which is about 1.3 billion tons, is wasted. Even if just 25% of the food currently lost or wasted globally could be saved, it would be enough to feed 870 million hungry people in the world.
  3. Bring your own water bottle  when you travel. Jut refill from the room faucet. You will save many bottles from ending up in a landfill or the ocean.
  4. Try to walk more or rent a bike when you travel. Either way, it’s so much better to explore a city or village by foot or bike. You will truly see the sights when you avoid traveling by car. And you will be reducing your carbon footprint. A “win-win.”
  5. To take care of our planet and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, eat more fruits and vegetables and less meat. Order more salads, pasta with vegetables, vegetable soups. Think grilled vegetables for a main entree. This is a practice you can also follow at home. Shifting diets away from meat could decrease by 50% per capita greenhouse gas emissions related to eating habits worldwide. Decreasing greenhouse gas emissions can also help limit additional deforestation — a major contributor to climate change.

References

  1. Key facts on food loss and waste you should know! | FAO | Food and …
    http://www.fao.org/save-food/resources/keyfindings/en
  2. Studies Show Link Between Red Meat and Climate Change | Climate …
    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/studies-link-red-meat-and-climate-change-20264

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people improve their health with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

TOP Tips for Eat Healthy While Traveling Abroad

Amsterdam hummus

Traveling abroad during the holiday season is a delight not only for those seeking to be with their loved ones during this special time of year, but also for people who want to celebrate this magical season in a different part of the world.  To keep you eating well and feeling great while traveling, I’ve shared my TOP tips with AutoEurope. A big part of traveling is the enjoyment of trying different regional cuisines. My tips include a list of the “healthy” and “not-so healthy” dishes you may encounter in different countries. Enjoy them ALL! Just balance out the “not-so healthy ” with the “healthy” dishes.It’s SO much easier to stay on track with healthy eating if you’re prepared before you leave for your destination. Enjoy your trip. Happy holidays! Bon voyage!

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). She is a nationally-recognized and award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management, travel nutrition, and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

Eating Well While Traveling on a Budget

Paris view

The day has finally arrived and tomorrow you leave for the vacation you’ve been planning for months.  Of course you have planned everything, including your budget.  You’ve accounted for plane tickets, hotel accommodation, and excursion costs, but did you allow proper food expenses?  And how are you going to eat healthy while staying on budget?

It can be very easy to underestimate how much you will actually spend on food and beverages while away from home, but there are ways to save a little extra in your bank account while keeping the dreaded vacation weight off.  If you dine out frequently, it is easier to put less nutritious food in your body more often than you would otherwise.  However, it is important to not miss out on trying traditional foods of that region. That is part of the fun of traveling, right?  There are plenty of ways to make sure that you eat healthy and not break your bank while you’re at it.  Plan ahead and consider these tips to eat healthy while traveling on a budget!

paris-produce-stand

In Transit:

  • Pack some snacks! Plan ahead and bring a few nutritious items that are easy to pack such as fruit, almonds, or granola bars.  It might even prevent you from stopping at the local gas station for that pop and bag of chips you’ve been thinking about.  Your wallet and body will thank you.
  • Check out the cooler section. The cooler has nutritious options such as veggie snack packs, yogurt, and fruit cups, which are great grab-and-go choices that won’t cost much or add to your waist line and will keep you full until the next stop.

 

paris-market

On Location:

  • Check if breakfast is included in your accommodation or offered at a low cost. If it is, take advantage.  A bonus is that there are usually foods specific to the region available as well as more classic but healthy options like fruit, yogurt, and cereal.
  • Depending where you are traveling to, you may not have access to a refrigerator. Having access to a refrigerator can be wonderful for your budget.  This allows you to purchase food from a grocery store and actually store extras.  Also, if you dine in a restaurant, you can save half of your meal for the next day.  This will not only stretch your budget a little farther but also controls portion sizes.  Ask your hotel if they can supply you with a room refrigerator.
  • Visit local grocery stores or produce stands. This will allow you to purchase nutritious foods at a lower price, saving you money from restaurant dining. If you have access to a kitchen while traveling, cook some of your meals. If you only have a refrigerator, stock up on sandwich ingredients and prepare some of you lunches. From personal experience, this is my favorite way to save money while traveling. You can eat some healthy meals and avoid continuous restaurant eating, since you can control whats going into your meal, enjoy the local produce,  and use healthy cooking/prep methods.

Although you may be on a budget, it does not mean that you can’t eat healthfully while traveling.  With a little planning, you can limit your food spending while eating delicious and healthy meals. Bon voyage!

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Special thanks to the fabulous writing contributions of nutrition intern, Emily Pearson. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

How to Eat Well in a Chinese Restaurant

Yao pic1

Heavy on vegetables and lean protein, Chinese food is an Asian cuisine that can fit into a healthy diet. However, it often gets a bad rap as it’s notoriously known for it’s high salt content. As for those delicious sauces and steaming bowls of soup, they account for the majority of the added salt. But the emphasis of vegetables in the various dishes have many health benefits that make Chinese cuisine a healthy option when dining out. Think platter of large mushrooms, Bok choy, Chinese broccoli, Lotus root and eggplant. These vegetables are loaded with potassium and antioxidants. And vegetables are great if you’re trying to slim down. As for the rice, try to limit to 1 cup, as this amount packs in 240 calories. Better yet, order the brown rice, which has the same calories, but contains fiber and more B vitamins. For those with high blood pressure or salt sensitivity, either learn how to prepare this cuisine at home using less sodium, or manage your health when dining out and request steamed dishes with sauce on the side. And, of course, use the sauce sparingly. Check out the five tips below ro help you order healthier fare at your favorite Chinese spot.                                                                        

Five Tips For Choosing Healthy Chinese Dishes

  1. Ask your server to have your meal steamed with only a small amount of sauce or have sauce served on the side.
  2. Choose vegetable dishes with either tofu, seafood, or chicken as the protein source.
  3.  Limit dishes served with red meat: beef, lamb, veal or pork.
  4. Avoid fried dishes and fatty meats, such as General Tsao’s Chicken, spare ribs, and fried rice. You’ll be saving an abundance of calories, as well as fat.
  5. If you have high blood pressure, avoid the soup. Order sauces on the side.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN was recently honored as the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of the Year by the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She loves traveling the world and experiencing new foods and cultures, and meeting interesting people. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy (Nirvana Press 2012). Lisa maintains a nutrition practice in NYC and Huntington, Long Island where she specializes in weight management, diabetes and travel nutrition. Lisa is also the CEO of Eat Well Restaurant Nutrition where she collaborates with chefs to get healthy dishes on the menu. For more info on Lisa, visit here.