The TOP 5 Travel Snacks

veg-stand-montrealWhether you travel by plane, boat, car or bike, packing the right travel snacks can help you feel your best while you’re on the go. Quite often people don’t think about what foods to bring, and ultimately, end up feeling fatigued and sometimes with gastrointestinal issues. Making sure you pack the right snacks will keep you feeling well-fueled with the energy you need to ensure a great trip. So what makes a good snack which will keep you feeling great? Choose a snack that has at least 3 grams of fiber, is low in sugar (6 grams or less per serving), contains at least 5 grams of protein  and some healthy fat (which consumed together will keep you satisfied longer). Healthy portable snacks include:

  1. Energy bars, such as KIND or Lara bars
  2. Nuts and fruit
  3. Hummus and raw vegetables
  4. Fresh fruit and yogurt
  5. Peanut butter sandwich

Bring snacks along with you before you get on the plane, boat, etc. This will ensure that you won’t get overly hungry and will have nourishing food with you. Once you get to your destination, visit a farmer’s market or grocery store to pick up additional healthy snacks to have on hand.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN, CLT is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, food influencer, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She is the co-author of “Making Nutrition Your Business,” 2nd Edition, Eat Right Press 2018.. In addition Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult plant-based nutrition, food sensitivities and diabetes. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

 

 

 

Four Tips to Take Care of Your Heart

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February is National Heart Month so it’s a perfect time to start paying more attention to your heart. Practicing positive self-care should also include being attentive to your heart and what it requires to be healthy. Incorporating a healthy lifestyle routine into your daily life will provide an array of health benefits for many years to come. A healthy lifestyle routine includes eating well and exercise on a daily basis. When it comes to heart health, it’s good to know how nutrition can be a powerful influencer. Read the  four tips below to enjoy the benefits of a healthy heart!

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  1. Choose heart-healthy monounsaturated fats in place of saturated fats. These healthy fats include, olives, olive oil, avocados, nuts, nut butter and canola oil. Saturated fats (butter, animal fats, cream, whole milk) should be used sparingly.
  2. Avoid trans fats. These fats include fried foods (sorry French fries and donuts!), stick margarine and Crisco.
  3. Eat more plant-based meals. Swap the beef burger for a veggie or Portobello mushroom burger. Grill tofu and add that to your salad in place of grilled chicken. Enjoy a peanut butter sandwich in place of the usual ham and cheese.
  4. Load up on fiber. Fiber helps lower cholesterol. So swap out the white bread for whole grain. Add beans to your soups and salads. Prepare salads and side dishes with quinoa, sorghum and farro. Add a tablespoon of chia seeds to your cereal or yogurt for an extra five grams of fiber.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, food influencer, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She is the co-author of “Making Nutrition Your Business,” Second Edition. In addition Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management, plant-based nutrition, food sensitivities and diabetes. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

Stay Trim: 72 Hours in London 

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London is a fabulous city to explore, shop and eat your way through. There is so much history coupled with amazing art (put the Tate Modern and Victorian and Albert on your list!), fashion and food that you can be dazzled for days, let alone hours. In addition to all of the sites and museums, this melting pot of great diversity is reflected in the wonderful restaurants that portray a wide variety of international cuisine. So traveling to London must also include partaking in the fabulous food scene. Whatever you do during your trip, make sure you include the Food Hall at Harrod’s for an amazing showcase of beautiful food and multiple dining venues. It’s truly a visual treat for food enthusiasts.


London is well known for its wonderful international cuisine, including Indian as well as Persian and Lebanese. If you have a diverse palate, I highly recommend trying them all!
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As a nutritionist I also know the importance of feeling well while you travel. You want to avoid bouts of indigestion (and potential constipation) and the sluggishness of eating too much. Who wants to have to sit it out at the hotel and limit your travel experience because you don’t feel 100%? Plus you don’t want to return home with tight fitting clothes. So here are some tips to keep you feeling well and trim as you experience London. Also included at the end are some amazing restaurants you should visit in London. Enjoy your journey.

Five Tips for Eating Well, Staying Trim and Feeling Great in London

1. Instead of relying on cabs, buses and the tube, walk. You will see SO much plus you’ll be adding in some exercise, which burns calories and keeps you feeling well and energized.

2. When you are dining, put an emphasis on vegetable-centric meals. Think salads, grilled vegetable plates and sides. The fiber in the food will fill you faster with less calories and will also aid regularity and intestinal health.

3. Order fresh fruit for dessert. Or visit a fruit market and purchase fruit to have in your hotel room for snacks.

4. Choose vegan dishes when possible. Plant protein, which is found in plant-based dishes reduces your risk for heart disease, diabetes and many types of cancer.

5. To stay fit, take a fast-paced morning walk, visit the hotel gym or download an exercise app on your phone and get a workout in your hotel room. Highly recommend Gaia for yoga and Fitness for Weight Loss for a variety of daily workouts.
London Restaurants You Don’t Want to Miss

1.Veersswamy–oldest Indian restaurant in London. And exceptional food.

2. The River Cafe–award-winning Italian restaurant located on the bank of the River Thames.

3. The Ritz Hotel for High Tea

4. Manoush– casual place with delicious Lebanese food.

5. Ritorrio–excellent Italian food

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, food influencer, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. She is the co-author of soon-to-be-released book “Making Nutrition Your Business,” Second Edition. In addition Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management, plant-based nutrition and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

 

Four Tips for Staying Trim While You Travel 

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We’ve all heard from friends who like to travel how they rarely can make it home without unwanted pounds. Traveling and weight gain don’t have to go hand in hand. Yes, you can enjoy wonderful meals and maintain your weight. One of the pleasures of travel is the experience to try new and delicious food. Whether at a corner cafe in Amsterdam, a taverna in Athens or a food truck in Austin, the joy in trying and enjoying new flavors is truly part of our travel memories.

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Traveling is a wonderful time to enjoy yourself and your surroundings. But you don’t want to be so concerned about what you can and can’t eat to avoid gaining weight. Don’t allow any  negative energy to zap some of the pleasure from your trip. To help you enjoy your trip and avoid weight gain, I’ve put together four “tried and true” tips  to help you enjoy new cuisine and stay svelte. So pack your bags and enjoy your trip. No worries about gaining weight!

Four Tips For Avoiding Travel Weight Gain

1. Eat more at breakfast and lunch. Yes, enjoy the hotel buffet.

2. Make dinner your lightest meal. Soups, salads, grilled vegetable platters, grilled fish or lean meats are all good choices.

3. If you have dessert, share it. Or better yet, forgo the rich pastry and enjoy a dish of fresh fruit.

4. Limit alcohol which contributes additional calories to your diet. In addition, alcohol can increase your appetite and cause you to eat more. If you’re going to imbibe, choose wine or vodka, rum or gin on the rocks. Skip the sugary mixes.

To maintain your weight while you travel, emphasize healthy choices. But most important, enjoy your trip!

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, food influencer, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management, vegetarian nutrition and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

 

5 Things You Can Do Now to Reduce Climate Change

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Now that Washington has declared that climate change is a non-issue, we, as people living on this beautiful planet, must each do our part to protect our home. And we need to not think just of ourselves, but for our children, grandchildren and future generations to come. Now, more than ever, we must all play an active role in protecting the earth by reducing climate change. You may be asking yourself “what can I do” to help our world? There are quite a few things you can do starting now to help. Get involved. Do your part and become a climate change activist!

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5 Things You Can Start Doing Today to Reduce the Effects of Climate Change

  1. Eat more plant-based meals. Think hummus and avocado sandwiches or peanut butter in place of cold cuts. Swap meat for veggie burgers, grilled tofu, quinoa, beans, sorghum and sliced portobello mushrooms. A study published last April 2016 by the World Resources Institute showed that reducing heavy red meat consumption — primarily beef and lamb — would lead to a per capita food and land use-related greenhouse gas emissions reduction of between 15 and 35 percent by 2050. Going vegetarian or vegan could reduce those per capita emissions by half.
  2. Buy a water bottle and fill it up at home to quench your thirst throughout the day. Stop purchasing bottled water.
  3. Get solar power for electricity in your home.
  4. If you’re planning to purchase or lease a new car, seek out a hybrid or a electric car.
  5. Use reusable bags when you shop. Forgo the plastic.

What do you do to reduce climate change? Please let me know and I can share with my blog readers. Together we are stronger. Thank you.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, food influencer, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

Traveling Abroad Gluten-Free

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Traveling abroad with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may pose a challenge at first. But if you do your homework before you leave home, you may find it quite manageable. The key is to do your research so you are not left starving or unsure if what you are eating is in fact gluten-free. And very important, especially for those with celiac disease, make sure you are well-versed in avoiding cross-contamination with gluten. If you feel that you are lacking in basic celiac disease nutrition and how to order in restaurants, meet with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease before you leave for your destination. You can find a RDN to help you on The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website. Don’t let your diet restriction stop you from enjoying this amazing experience on which you are about to embark!

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Here are  three areas to familiarize yourself with: the food customs, language and the new locale:

1. Food customs: have an understanding of how traditional dishes are prepared and the ingredients used so you know what is gluten-free, what to avoid and what can be modified.

2. Language: be able to communicate your needs and identify key words that indicate sources of gluten. Have a smart phone? Download a translation application to ease the language barrier. Google Translate is a user friendly app. Although English may be spoken as a second language in your city of travel, it is unlikely the word gluten or celiac is understood so know the translation in the area’s primary language. An excellent resource for gluten-free dining out is the app GF Card (free for iPhone or iPad) which contains gluten-free dining cards in fifty languages. Simply show your iPhone to your server. If you don’t have an iPhone, visit http://www.TriumphDining.com to order gluten-free dining cards.

3. Locale: know where you can stop in to purchase packaged snacks or fresh fruits to fuel your travels. If you are staying in a place with a kitchen it may be a good idea to stock up on gluten-free dried pastas, bread, cereal, quinoa, crackers and rice to break up the meals eaten out.

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Pack gluten-free snacks to avoid searching aimlessly for gluten-free options, taking away from valuable sightseeing time. Airports are also a great spot to stock up on healthy packaged snack foods. KIND bars, NuGo Free Dark Chocolate Trail Mix protein bars, dried fruit and nuts are some examples. Dehydrated rice noodles, bean soups and gluten-free oatmeal packets are easy to carry along and just require hot water, easy to come across in most hotels, cafés or corner stops. Look for gluten free wraps you can carry along so you can simply request the sandwich fillings be made in your wraps and even bring along plastic gloves just in case. Know that continental breakfasts will unlikely have gluten free breads/cereals and the risk for contamination is likely going to be quite high. Yogurt, cheese, peanut butter, eggs and fresh fruit are good options for breakfast when dining out.

Before booking a hotel, it would be wise to ask if special arrangements can be made. Request to have a small refrigerator in your room. Stock up on inexpensive grab-n-go breakfast food such as gluten free granola bars, dried fruit and rice cakes with a nut butter spread.
 For eating out, research the area beforehand to find those restaurants which will accommodate the gluten-free traveler. Look on the Internet for restaurants which serve gluten-free dishes. Choose those places that understand risk of cross-contamination.

When ordering here are a few requests you might need to ensure cross-contamination is avoided:

1. Make sure your meat is cooked on a clean surface, meaning not the same grill where bread/buns are toasted.

2. Make sure the vegetables have not been cut on the same cutting board as any flour products.

3. Gluten free pizzas need to be cooked on clean surfaces and gluten free pasta needs to be boiled in clean water, not the same water previously used to cook wheat pasta and the same thing goes for any fry order.

4. Tip generously especially if the restaurant or café makes special plates and is very accommodating. This will only encourage similar behavior for the next traveler.

Gluten-free in major cities abroad: Do some research online before you travel, so you have a list of GF dining options in your locale. Below are some of the GF establishments that we found in our searching.

Italy: the land of bread, pasta and pizza is very welcoming to the gluten free traveler. The Italian Coeliac Society certifies restaurants claiming gluten-free on their menu to assure the consumer there will be no risk for cross-contamination.

Rome:

La Soffitta Renovatio
Piazza del Risorgimento, 46/a

Il Viaggio
Via Isonzo, 14

Voglia Di Pizza
Via dei Giubbonari, 33

Florence:
Ciro and Sons – Ristorante Pizzeria Firenze
Via del Giglio, 28

Da Garibardi
Piazza del Mercato Centrale, 38R

Ristorante Hostaria Il Desco
Via delle Terme, 23/ r

Paris: Many restaurants and bakeries offer gluten-free fare. Here are a few recommended choices.

The Chambelland Boulangerie

Twinkie Breakfasts

NOGLU – GF Bakery

London:

Niche Gluten-free Dining
British menu in all-day cafe/restaurant
197-199 Rosebery Ave

LEGGERO
Gluten-free Italian restaurant
64 Old Compton St

Beyond Bread
Gluten-free bakery & cafe
2 Charlotte Pl

Barcelona:

La Lluna
Calle Santa Anna, 20

Gut
Carrer del Perill, 13
Cozy · Casual · Locals

Ristorante Pizzeria Il Piccolo Focone
Carrer del Dos de Maig, 268
Cozy · Casual · Locals

Conesa
Carrer de la Llibreteria, 1
Casual · Locals

A terrific website is www.glutenfreepassport.com for finding info on restaurants, traveling tips, travel language guides and a variety of gluten-free and food allergy apps. Take the time to review it before you embark on your trip. For more specifics by country: if you are traveling to Mallorca, France, Indonesia, Bolivia, Chile, Easter Island, Thailand, Finland, Australia, Montreal, Abu Dhabi, Sweden, Italy, Columbia or Sri Lanka just to name a few, here are stories from gluten-free travelers.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people transform their lives with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.

Smooth Travels: Don’t Let Constipation Hinder Your Trip

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Traveling not only opens doors to new experiences and cultures, but also offers you the pleasure of trying new foods that you’ve probably never tasted before. You should take some time to enjoy the new foods and flavors that are at your destination. Quite often the  wonderful food will be a major highlight of your trip. However, as you may unfortunately already know, dining out daily while traveling can lead to a variety digestive issues, including constipation.

Why does this happen?  Many restaurant meals can be lacking in dietary fiber, which we need to keep things moving along in the intestinal tract. Think about it. How often are you served fiber-rich foods when you travel, such as whole grain breads, vegetables, fresh fruit, nuts and beans? Probably seldom. Often the breads and other grains served abroad (and in the U.S.) are refined, meaning they have had the fiber removed. And the vegetables served with a meal are very sparse. It can be much easier to consume foods with fiber at home.

Paris 2 produce stand

 

Becoming constipated when you travel can put  a damper on your trip.When you travel you want to feel good so you can enjoy your time exploring your new surroundings. You don’t want to be troubled with constipation. So making an effort to get adequate fiber should be at the top of your list. According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, fiber recommendations are 25 grams per day for woman and 35 grams per day for men. If you have been plagued by intestinal issues in the past when traveling, or want to avoid a potential problem, check out these tips.

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4 Tips to Help Avoid Constipation While Traveling

1. Bring along some high fiber bars for your trip.  KIND and Kashi bars are smart choices. Bring enough to have two per day, if you need it. If you find that the breakfast options where you are traveling are low in fiber, add a bar to your breakfast. They also come in handy for a mid-afternoon snack. Look for bars that contain at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. These are great

2. When you dine out, ask for whole grain bread. Have a salad and/or a serving of vegetables at lunch and dinner. Order high fiber soups, such as Lentil or Minestrone. Try something new like a veggie burger or a grilled vegetable sandwich. Craving pasta? Think Pasta Primavera with extra veggies. And ask for whole wheat pasta–they might have it! For dessert, request a dish of fresh fruit.

3. Make an effort to drink fluids. Aim for at least 8 cups per day. Be eco-conscious and bring your own water bottle from home. Drinking helps keep you hydrated and helps the fiber move through your intestine. Inadequate fluid can lead to constipation.

4. Plan ahead and do an Internet search for farmers’ markets where you will be traveling. Plan a trip to the market and purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts to keep in your room for snacks. If your destination does not have a marketplace, visit the local grocery store and stock up on produce, nuts and whole grain cereals.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who is passionate about helping people improve their health with optimal nutrition. She received the 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year from the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Lisa is an entrepreneur, speaker, private practitioner, and writer. She consults with food startups and restaurants to help put health on the menu. Lisa is the author of the ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice she specializes in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her two degrees in Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and virtually. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit here.