Healthy Traveling Tips for 2016

earth-1426389-639x631The New Year is here, which is a great time to plan your personal travel itinerary for the upcoming year. Where do you want to go? What places are on your bucket list yearning to be scratched off? Traveling makes memories that stay with you forever. Experiencing new places and cultures, plus the added potential to meet new people, adds to your personal growth. Traveling  can enhance your life in so many ways. When you travel , whether for business or pleasure, you want to feel your best as you take on the world. The worst thing is to end up staying hankered down to your hotel room because you aren’t feeling well. One of the smartest things you can do to ensure a great trip is to plan ahead and get a healthy diet in place before you embark on your journey. Then upon departure you keep up the healthy eating plan as you travel to your destination, Once there, keep the healthy eating momentum going. Feel great and enjoy your time away. And when you return home, you should continue to reap the rewards of a healthy diet. Your energy level will be soaring, your weight will likely be the same, and you will feel great. Enjoy your trip!

Here are four tips to help you have a fabulous trip:

  1. Before you leave for your trip, start adding more plant-foods to your diet (aka fruits, vegetables, whole grain, beans and nuts). Eating more of these nutrient-rich foods will help increase your immunity to prevent getting sick before you embark on your trip, or on the plane which is an atmosphere rampant with unfriendly germs. And the added fiber will help keep your digestive system running smoothly. Thus, plant-foods are a win-win!
  2. Bring snacks from home for your trip. Fresh fruit, cut-up vegetables and hummus, nuts and energy bars are great to keep on-hand for your flight. Some airports have definitely improved upon the healthy snacks you can purchase to bring onboard. Energy bars and individual bags of plain instant oatmeal are also good to bring along for a light breakfast when you travel. Bring enough energy bars so you can have one per day, if needed.
  3. When you get to your destination, visit a local produce stand or market to buy fruits and vegetables for your room. Quite often, travelers have problems with regularity as the fiber content of foods in most restaurants can be quite low.
  4. When dining out, opt for fruits and/or vegetables at each meal. if fruit salad is on the breakfast menu,  add it to your order. At lunch, ask if your sandwiach can be made on whole grain bread. Or order a salad or vegetable-based soup, such as Minestrone as a main course. At dinner, have a side salad or an entree salad or grilled vegetable plate as your main course. Fresh fruit is great for dessert. If not on the menu, enjoy the fruit you purchased when you return to your room.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN was recently honored as the The 2015 Outstanding Dietitian of The Year by The New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She is a speaker, blogger, entrepreneur and innovator who is passionate about spreading the message of healthy eating for optimal health. To help restaurants improve upon menu choices and food preparation, Lisa recently founded Eat Well Restaurant Nutrition where she collaborates with chefs. She is also the author of the e-book The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and the widely-acclaimed The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy (Nirvana Press 2012). In her private practice, with offices in Huntington, NY and the Upper East Side of Manhattan, Lisa specializes in weight managment and diabetes for teens and adults. For more info, contact Lisa via email or visit here.

Four TOP Tips To Avoid The Flu

fruit stand in IsraelFlu season is here! Why wait until it creeps up on you when you can follow some key strategies to help avoid it. Having a strong immune system can help you feel great and stay healthy. So plan your strategy and do your best to stay well this season. Getting sick means missing work, having to cancel upcoming  social activities and impending travel plans. So make the right choices and stay healthy. Here are four tried and true tips for beating the nasty flu. To your health!

1. Eat foods that boost your immunity. Foods that will help keep the flu away include almonds, mushrooms, fruits high in vitamin C such as strawberries, tomatoes, mangoes, oranges and grapefruits, fermented foods, which contain probiotics, such as yogurt with live cultures, kimchi or miso, green tea, kombucha, and pickles. Include at least a few of these foods in your daily diet. At breakfast, enjoy an orange or a small pink grapefruit along with your cereal or yogurt. At lunch, try an almond butter sandwich with a cup of green tea. At dinner, a grilled portobello mushroom burger or a bowl of steamy mushroom soup are two great ways to wind down your day.

2. Get enough zzz’s! Sleep impacts your immunity ,so don’t try to cut your sleep time short. Teens need 9 to 10 hours of sleep daily while adults can manage well with 7 to 8. Just like you would put work and the gym on your daily schedule, don’t forget to pencil in sleep!

3. Exercise! A good workout will reduce your chances of getting sick. Aim to exercise at least five times per week. If you can’t get to the gym, workout with an app or grab your pedometer (aim for 10,000 steps per day) and go for a walk.

4. Wash your hands. Keep germs at bay by washing your hands frequently throughout the day.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN was recently honored as 2015 The Outstanding Dietitian Of The Year by The New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She is the author of the e-book The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and the widely-acclaimed book The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy (Nirvana Press 2012). Lisa is a nutrition specialist in weight management, travel nutrition and diabetes for teens and adults. She is in private practice with offices in Huntington, NY and the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Contact Lisa at eatwellrd@yahoo.com or for more info: www.lisastollmanrd.com.

Have No Fear: Traveling Abroad with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

fruits-and-vegetablesWhen you travel you want to feel great so you can enjoy your trip. For those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), an intestinal disorder that can cause stomach pains, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, it can sometimes make traveling more nerve wrecking than appealing. Although approximately 1 in 5 Americans has signs and symptoms of IBS, less than 1 in 5 seek medical help. As a chronic condition, management of IBS can be long term. However, in many people, symptoms may not be that bothersome or can even disappear completely. For those of you that have IBS, by implementing certain planning into your travel plans, you can enjoy your travels worry free! So read on for travel tips that will help you have a fabulous trip.

11 Travel Tips for Traveling with IBS

1. If you don’t know how to manage your symptoms via diet, meet with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) before your trip, so you are aware of the best food choices for you to eat. Just an FYI: meeting with an RDN will be helpful, whether or not you are traveling. Visit here to find a RDN in your locale who specializes in GI health.

2. Keep in easy reach: fiber supplements, medications, bottled water and snacks (i.e. nuts, high-fiber energy bars (such as KIND), fresh fruit).

3. Stay well hydrated as you travel. Keep a bottle of water with you to sip on and have a couple glasses of fluid every time you sit down for a meal. Being dehydrated can exacerbate GI symptoms, causing constipation and gas.

4. To keep your fiber intake up, order salads and/or vegetables with your meals. Have fresh fruit for dessert.

5. Stop at farmer’s markets to pick up fresh fruit for snacks.

6. When traveling abroad, if you have poorly controlled GI symptoms, investigate what measures you have to easily access bathrooms. Find out if you will need special coins and if you will have to have your own toilet paper.

7. When booking flights, opt for the aisle seat for easier access to on flight bathroom.

8.  If traveling in a foreign country learn phrases, such as “Where’s the bathroom”, “I can’t eat….” or “Can you make…[dish]…without?” The Google translate app can help with language translations.

9. Traveling doesn’t always have the same schedule as one’s daily schedule at home, but try to consume the same number of meals you’re used to with similar portion sizes.

10. If you’re up to trying new foods, experiment in small amounts with foods you’re unsure of.

11. If you are feeling anxious while traveling, make sure you get your daily hour of exercise in. The meditation app Insight Timer (free for iPhone) may also help you calm down and feel relaxed.

Asking lots of questions while you travel regarding food preparation and bathroom logistics may be a pain, but in the long run it will provide a more stress free trip.  Having a few of the above-mentioned essentials can ease travel plans, but resist the temptation of over planning! By leaving room for spontaneity, you can truly enjoy your journey. Bon voyage!

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and the author of The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad and The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy. She is a writer and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in private practice, based on Huntington, Long Island and NYC. Lisa was recently honored as the 2015 Distinguished Dietitian of The Year by the New York Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  Lisa specializes in travel nutrition, weight management, and diabetes for teens and adults. To find out more about Lisa, visit http://www.lisastollmanrd.com. Special thanks to Nikki Nies, nutrition writer and RDN-to-be for contributing to this blogpost.

Five Tips for Healthy Traveling

travel_agentsWhether enjoying the tranquility of a beautiful beach or exploring the spice markets of Istanbul, traveling allows you the chance to explore new places and enhance your knowledge of the world around you. Staying healthy while you travel can ensure that you make the most of your time. So use the following tips to feel well as you begin your journey and onward.

1. If you are traveling abroad and want to start off with a healthy meal inflight, you can order a special meal from the airline 48 hours in advance. You can choose from a variety of choices including Vegetarian, Hindu Vegetarian and Asian.

2. Make sure you stay hydrated as you travel. Purchase bottles of water as you explore your surroundings. or keep it green and bring along your water bottle from home and refill with clean water.

3. Stop at local farmer’s markets and buy some fresh fruit for snacks. The fruit will provide you with a wealth of nutrients, in addition to much needed fiber to keep you regular.

4. Bring along some packable snacks, such as KIND bars and nuts. It’s easier to have healthy snacks on hand, plus it helps with portion control.

5. Make sure to order salads or sides of vegetables in restaurants. Veggies will help fill you up and not weigh you down. Ask for dressings and sauces on the side.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is an award-winning Nutritionist and the author of The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad and The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy. She is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in private practice and writer based in Huntington, Long Island and NYC. Lisa specializes in travel nutrition, weight management, and diabetes for teens and adults. To find out more about Lisa, visit www.lisastollmanrd.com

Vegetarian or Vegan: What’s the Diff?

Chicken Kebabs and Rice With increasing scientific studies promoting the health benefits of consuming plant-based foods, it’s no wonder vegetarian and vegan diets have surged as popular ways to eat. Many people choose to follow either diet for a variety of reasons. Animal rights, protecting the planet, religious beliefs, and improved health are just a few. Followed correctly, each can offer substantial health benefits such as lowering the risk for heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and many types of cancer. However, if animal products are not substituted appropriately, the risk for developing deficiencies in certain nutrients, including protein, vitamins, and minerals is increased. Plant-based eating can improve your health–just make sure that your meals are well-planned, so you consume the nutrients your body needs.

If you’re interested in following either diet you should be fond of vegetables, whole grains and non-meat alternatives such as tofu, nuts, and beans as these will all serve as the basis for many of your meals. It is essential you take the time to educate yourself on how to properly follow these diets. If well-thought out and well-planned, nutrition deficiencies can be avoided, health benefits gained and you will be fit and fueled. To guarantee you follow a well-balanced vegetarian or vegan diet, you should meet with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) to receive expert nutritional guidance.

Let’s look at these two styles of eating and see how they differ:

Vegetarian Diets

*Vegetarian diets can be sub-divided into a few different categories:
True vegetarians (also known as lacto-ovo vegetarians) avoid all meat, fish and poultry but do consume eggs and dairy products.

* Lacto-vegetarians eat dairy products but avoid eggs, meat, fish and poultry, and ovo-vegetarians eat eggs but avoid dairy, meat, fish and poultry.

*Similarly, “flexitarian” and “semi-vegetarian,” which are basically the same, describe a diet that consists largely of vegetarian items with the occasional meat, fish or poultry source thrown into the mix.

*Vegetarians who also eat fish are known as pescatarians.

True vegetarians typically obtain protein from dairy (milk, yogurt and cheese), eggs and soy products. Tempeh, a texturized protein made from soybeans, brown rice, millet and barley, and seitan, made from wheat gluten (a protein found in wheat), are two meat alternatives many vegetarians also include in their diet. With a wide variety of protein sources available, the vegetarian diet is easy to follow with little risk for deficiency.

Vegan Diets

Compared to the vegetarian diet, following a vegan diet requires more planning to ensure that adequate protein, vitamins and minerals are consumed. Vegans omit all foods from animal sources. Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy and butter are avoided. Many vegans also avoid honey. With fewer options for protein, plant-based proteins, such as soy products (tofu and soy milk), protein-fortified almond milk, tempeh, beans, nuts, legumes, seitan, vegetables and whole grains become the staples at meals.

Those who want to follow a vegan diet need to make sure that they get sufficient nutrients, such as protein and calcium. To ensure adequate protein is consumed, a variety of these plant-protein foods mentioned above should be consumed regularly at meals. As stated before, you may want to meet with a RDN to ensure that the diet is well-planned. Because vitamin B-12 is found only in animal products, vegans need to supplement their diet with this vitamin.  Vegans may seek out fortified food sources, such as soy milk fortified with vitamin B-12, to obtain this vitamin or simply take in the form of a pill supplement. Since dairy products are not consumed, calcium can also become an issue so appropriate food alternatives, such as calcium-fortified tofu, soy or almond milk and dark green leafy vegetables, need to be included in the diet daily. If nutritional needs for calcium can’t be obtained through food alone, a calcium supplement should be taken. Vegans also need to pay special attention to getting enough vitamin D, calcium, iron, zinc and iodine. In order to obtain the health benefits of either a vegetarian or vegan diet, either diet needs to be followed properly.

Differences between Vegetarian and Vegan Diets 

Vegetarian
Foods included: Milk, cheese, butter, eggs, grains, tofu, seitan, tempeh, nuts, beans, fruits, vegetables,

Foods avoided: Meat, fish, chicken

Vegan
Foods included: Tofu, seitan, tempeh, nuts, beans, whole grain breads and cereals, fortified-soy and almond milk, fruits and vegetables.
Foods avoided: Milk, cheese, butter, meat, fish. chicken, eggs, dairy (some vegans also avoid honey)
Nutrients which may be lacking:
Vegetarians should be able to easily meet all of their nutrient needs if they make healthy food choices.
Supplements required: Vegans need to take a vitamin B12 supplement. If food sources of vitamin D, iron, calcium, zinc and iodine don’t meet nutritional needs, a supplement may be needed.
Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN. CDE, CDN is a nationally-renowned teen and adult weight management expert with offices in Huntington, NY and the Upper East Side of Manhattan.  Lisa is the author of The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto: The Ten Essential Steps to Losing Weight, Looking Great and Getting Healthy (Nirvana Press 2012), the premier guide on healthy eating and weight management for teens. To find out more about Lisa, visit her website.

Eating Vegan While Traveling Abroad

IMG_2605Following a vegetarian, vegan or plant-based lifestyle has become extremely popular in today’s culture. Whether for health, sustainability of the planet or animal rights, the number of people adapting a plant-based diet is at an all time high. If you are a vegetarian, it is usually not difficult to consume a nutritious diet as you can omit the meat in restaurants, but still include dairy foods, such as milk, cheese and yogurt and eggs. If you adhere to a vegan diet, it can be a little tricky to meet your nutritional needs, especially when traveling, without some careful planning. People that are vegan do not consume any foods derived from animals. That means no meat, dairy or eggs. Many vegans also exclude honey from their diets.

If you follow a vegan diet and enjoy eating in restaurants, you may become familiar with the various establishments in your locale that offer vegan menu options or will oblige special requests and modify dishes to meet your needs. However, when you travel abroad you may find it difficult to find restaurants that will satisfy your vegan preferences. Google websites for vegan restaurants where you are traveling. You should find this quite helpful. Also be aware that you can order a vegan or vegetarian meal for your flight, but do so at least 48 hours in advance. You should be able to do this on the airline’s website.

If you follow a vegan diet exclusively, you should be aware that there are a handful of nutrients that you need to pay special attention to so you don’t develop a deficiency. These nutrients include protein, Vitamin B12, zinc, iron and calcium. Almost all foods except for alcohol, fruit, sugar, and fat provide some protein.

Protein’s role in the diet is to repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.Vegan protein sources include: lentils, chickpeas, tofu, peas, peanut and other nut butters, soy milk and protein-fortified almond milk, almonds and other nuts, peas, seitan (wheat gluten), edamame and tempeh.

Vitamin B12  is required for the formation red blood cells, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. Vitamin B12 is predominately found in animal foods. It can be difficult to get sufficient amounts from plant-based foods. If you are traveling, it may be wise to bring a package of Red Star nutritional yeast that you can add to foods for protein and Vitamin B12. Two tablespoons of nutritional yeast contains only 45 calories, but has 6 grams of protein and 100% of the RDA for Vitamin B12. If you bring a small container of it to restaurants, you can add it to soups, pasta, rice and stews.

Zinc has many important functions in the body.  It’s needed to maintain the body’s immune system. Zinc is also required for cell division, cell growth, wound healing and the digestion of carbohydrates. Zinc is also essential for both smell and taste. During pregnancy, infancy, and childhood the body needs zinc to grow and develop properly. Plant-based food sources of zinc include white beans, kidney beans, and chickpeas, zinc-fortified breakfast cereals, wheat germ and pumpkin seeds. While traveling, try to  order entrees which include beans when dining in restaurants.

Iron’s role in the body is to carry oxygen to all of the cells. Iron sources for vegetarians and vegans include iron-fortified breakfast cereals, spinach, kidney beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, turnip greens, molasses, whole wheat breads, peas, and some dried fruits (dried apricots, prunes, raisins). For vegetarians, egg yolk is also a good source of iron.

Calcium is the most plentiful mineral found in the human body. The majority of calcium is found in the teeth and bones. Nerve cells, body tissues, blood, and other body fluids contain the rest of the calcium.  In addition to building strong bones and teeth, calcium also helps blood to clot, sends and receives nerve signals, and maintains a normal heartbeat. Calcium food sources for vegans include calcium-fortified soymilk, calcium-fortified breakfast cereals and orange juice, almonds, tofu made with calcium sulfate, and dark-green leafy vegetables, including broccoli, collard, turnip and mustard greens, bok choy. Vegetarians can get adequate calcium from milk, cheese and yogurt.

If you are a vegan and traveling, don’t forget to bring a multiple vitamin/mineral supplement that is 100% of the Daily Value (DV). Taking a daily multiple vitamin/mineral supplement that provides sufficient amounts of Vitamin B12, calcium, zinc and iron is a good way to ensure adequate nutrition while you travel.

Some helpful tips for ordering vegan meals in restaurants abroad include:

1. If the restaurant doesn’t have a vegan option, request a vegetable plate.
If there is a salad that includes meat or cheese, and no vegan option, request that the meal and cheese be omitted. Ask for beans and/or avocado to be added.
2. Bring packets of oatmeal, bags of nuts and vegan protein bars from home when you travel.
3. Download Happy Cow, the free app for iPhone, to find vegetarian and vegan restaurants around the globe.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the new ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit: http://www.lisastollmanrd.com

What Can I Eat: Ideas for Healthy Meals and Snacks

   As a nutritionist, I’m regularly asked by my clients what are good foods to eat for meals and snacks. To answer that questions, over the years I’ve composed and updated this list. These meals and snacks all easy-to-prepare, high in fiber and will keep you full for several hours. Whether you are traveling or staying local at home. these suggestions can help you stay on track with healthy eating. Please note: I am not a consultant for any of these food companies. It is my professional opinion that they are all high-quality foods.

Breakfast:

*1 cup cereal such as Multigrain Cheerios or Barbaraʼs Cinnamon Puffins + 1 cup skim or almond milk + 1 small banana
*1/2 cup low fat cottage cheese mixed with 1 cup blueberries + 1 Thomasʼs Whole Grain Bagel Thin
                                                                                                                                                        *1 Arnoldʼs Whole Grain Sandwich Thin + 2 tbsp. natural peanut butter + 1 small banana
*Make a parfait: 1 cup nonfat Greek yogurt + 1 cup cereal + 1/2 cup sliced strawberries (add 1 packet or teaspoon of sugar if not sweet enough)
                                                                                                                                                                                    *Breakfast sandwich: 1 Arnoldʼs Whole Grain Sandwich Thin + 1 scrambled egg + 1 slice 2% cheese (such as Cabotʼs or Baby Bel) + tomato slices + 1 orange

If you are in a hurry: grab 1 granola bar + 1 cup nonfat yogurt and 1 apple

Lunch:

*1 Arnoldʼs Whole Grain Sandwich Thin + 2 tbsp hummus + 1/4 avocado slices + 2 tomato slices + side of carrot sticks and cucumber slices. Finish the meal with 1 apple or banana.                                                                                              *Spinach salad: 1 bowl (2 cups) of baby spinach. Add 3 ounces grilled chicken + 1/2 cup small white beans + 1 tbsp sliced almonds or chopped walnuts + 1 orange, peeled and sliced. Dressing: 2 tbsp. lite vinaigrette.   *Whole grain wrap with baby greens + shredded carrots + sliced tomato with 2 ounces low fat mozzarella cheese. Finish the meal with an apple or orange.                                                                                                                                                                                                      *Turkey sandwich: 2 slices whole grain bread + 3 ounces turkey breast + 1/4 avocado, sliced + side of raw carrot sticks + 1 orange or banana.                                                                                                                                                                                     *Veggie burger: 1 Arnoldʼs Whole Grain Sandwich Thin + 1 veggie burger (Amyʼs, Morningstar Farms, Gardenburger or Dr. Praegerʼs are all good choices) + 1/4 sliced avocado or 1 ounce cheese. Complete the meal with 1 cup of fresh strawberries or blueberries.

Dinner:

*Pasta and veggie toss: 1 cup whole wheat pasta, cooked + 2 cups chopped and sautéed broccoli and cauliflower or 1 bag broccoli slaw, sauteed. Add 1 cup sliced grape tomatoes. Use 2 tsp. olive oil + 2 cloves sliced garlic for sautéing. When veggies are done, add pasta to pan and mix together. Complete the meal with 1 orange or small pink grapefruit.
*3 ounces grilled salmon on a bed of sautéed peppers, onions and mushrooms. Add a salad (2 cups) of mixed greens with 1 tbsp. lite vinaigrette. Complete the meal with a cup of strawberries.                                                                         *3 ounces grilled chicken + 1/2 cup brown rice + 2 cups roasted veggies (zucchini + red peppers + onions). Roast veggies with 2 tsp. olive oil and pinch of salt at 400 degrees till slightly browned. Make a salad with baby spinach + 1/4 avocado, sliced and fresh orange slices. Timesaver: You can make extra roasted veggies for the next day! Make a sandwich (for lunch) with the roasted veggies + 2 tbsp. hummus or 2 ounces low fat cheese OR toss with 1 cup whole grain pasta for dinner.                                                                                                                                                                                           *2 cups homemade vegetable soup or 1 can such as Amy’s + large salad (3 cups baby spinach or mixed greens + 1 tbsp chopped nuts + 1 chopped cucumber + 1 chopped carrot + 1/2 cup grapes (cut in half). Dressing: 2 tbsp lite vinaigrette.

Snacks:

*1 granola bar + 1 fresh fruit
*1/2 cup cottage cheese + 1 cup blueberries                                                                                                                                             *Smoothie: 1 cup plain nonfat yogurt or skim, almond or soy milk + 1 cup fruit. Fill blender with ice to top. Blend and enjoy.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            *1 cup whole grain cereal (such as Multigrain Cheerios, Kashi Heart to Heart or Barbaraʼs Cinnamon Puffins + 1 cup skim, soy or almond milk                                                                                                                                                                                             *1 can Amyʼs soup, such as Minestrone or Vegetable Barley (look for soups that have 100 calories or less and at least 4 grams of fiber per serving                                                                                                                                                                                                                 *100 calorie bag of popcorn and 1 fruit

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the new ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit: www.lisastollmanrd.com

Traveling? Don’t Forget the Fiber!

IMG_0150

The Scoop

Traveling not only opens doors to new experiences and cultures, but also offers you the pleasure of trying new foods that you probably have never tasted before. You should enjoy all the new foods and flavors that are at your destination. However, as you (unfortunately) may already know, dining out while traveling can lead to digestive issues.

The food may be richer than what you usually eat at home. And many restaurant foods can be lacking in dietary fiber, which we need to keep things moving along in the intestinal tract. Fiber also helps keep us full longer, which is great for managing your weight. It can be difficult to find whole grains, beans, fresh fruit and vegetables in eating venues such as Parisian cafes and British pubs. Often the breads and other grains served abroad (and in the U.S.) are refined, and have had the fiber removed. It can be much easier to consume foods with fiber at home.

When you travel you want to feel good so you can enjoy your time exploring your new surroundings. You don’t want to be troubled with constipation and/or other gastrointestinal issues. So making an effort to get adequate fiber should be at the top of your list.  According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, fiber recommendations are 25 grams per day for woman and 35 grams per day for men. If you have been plagued by intestinal issues in the past when traveling, or want to avoid a potential problem, check out these tips.

The Tips

1. Bring along some high fiber bars for your trip. Fiber One and KIND bars are smart choices. Bring enough to have at least one per day. Look for bars that contain at least 3 grams of fiber per serving.

2. When you dine out, ask for whole grain bread. Have a salad and/or a serving of vegetables at lunch and dinner.

3. Make an effort to drink fluids. Aim for at least 8 cups per day. Drinking helps keep you hydrated and helps the fiber move through your intestine.  If you are trying to lose or maintain weight, water or seltzer is best.  All fluids count, with the exception of alcohol. So keep drinking!

3. Plan ahead and do a web search for farmers’ markets where you will be traveling. Visit the market and purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts to keep in your room for snacks. If your destination does not have a marketplace, visit the local grocery store and stock up on produce, nuts and whole grain cereals.

The List

Use this fiber list to ensure that you are getting enough daily to keep you healthy.

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the new ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012.). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit: www.lisastollmanrd.com

Healthy Eats at the U.S Open

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The U.S Open begins today. And what a joyous occasion for avid tennis geeks and their families and friends. All the top players will be there competing for the big prize.  Quite often people come and spend at least four hours at a clip taking in the various tennis matches. And they do get HUNGRY! In the past the U.S. Open was not known for their food offerings. But it’s getting better! This year you’ll find sushi (at Aces) and hummus sandwiches at the food court. Of course, there will be lots of places serving big steaks and burgers, but that’s not the healthiest fare.

Here are some tips for staying on track with healthy eating at the U.S. Open and a list of this year’s eating venues.  Enjoy the U.S. Open, eat healthy and feel GREAT!!

 Healthy Eating Tips

1. Stay hydrated. It’s hot outside, so although you’ll be sitting and watching, you will feel the heat. The best beverage for hydration is water. So keep a bottle handy and drink up.

2. Healthy dishes include salads, fruit plates, grilled chicken and fish. Veggie burgers and hummus platters are great choices for vegetarians and vegans.

3. Avoid the fried foods and refined carbohydrates (refined white bread, pasta and sugary drinks) which will only tire you out and have your eyes fighting to stay open during the long matches. Go for healthy complex carbohydrates such as fruits and vegetables, whole grain breads and beans.

4. If you order a sandwich, request whole grain bread. If they don’t have it on hand,  and if enough people ask, maybe it will be offered in 2015. Whole grain breads provide more nutrition and lasting energy. They’re also a good source of fiber.

5. If you plan to have an alcoholic beverage, have it with a meal as the food will slow down the absorption of alcohol. Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Just keep in mind: alcohol can make you tired. For a healthy alternative, have water, seltzer, a Virgin Mary or unsweetened iced tea.You don’t want to miss a game!

Here’s the list of all the eating venues (the GOOD and the NOT-SO-GOOD) this year at the U.S. Open. Have a great time!!

http://usta.usopen.org/US-Open/dining_at_the_open_restaurants/

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the new ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012.). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit: www.lisastollmanrd.com

 

Traveling Abroad Gluten-Free

086506a45643d61bb38d1ee16ac3738cTraveling abroad with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may pose a challenge at first. But once you do your homework you may find it quite manageable. The key is to do your research so you are not left starving or unsure if what you are eating is in fact gluten-free. Make sure you are well-versed in avoiding cross-contamination with gluten. Don’t let your diet restriction stop you from enjoying this amazing experience on which you are about to embark!

Remember these three areas to familiarize yourself with: the food customs, language and the new surroundings.

1. Food customs: have an understanding of how traditional dishes are prepared and the ingredients used so you know what is gluten-free, what to avoid and what can be modified.

2. Language: be able to communicate your needs and identify key words that indicate sources of gluten. Have a smart phone? Download a translation application to ease the language barrier. Google Translate is a user friendly app. Although English may be spoken as a second language in your city of travel, it is unlikely the word gluten or celiac is understood so know the translation in the area’s primary language. An excellent resource for gluten-free dining out is the app GF Card (free for iPhone or iPad) which contains gluten-free dining cards in fifty languages. Simply show your iPhone to your server. If you don’t have an iPhone, visit www.TriumphDining.com to order gluten-free dining cards.

3. The surroundings: know where you can stop in to purchase packaged snacks or fresh fruits to fuel your travels. If you are staying in a place with a kitchen it may be a good idea to stock up on gluten-free dried pastas, bread, cereal, quinoa, crackers and rice to break up the meals eaten out.

Pack gluten-free snacks to avoid searching aimlessly for gluten-free options, taking away from valuable sightseeing time. Airports are also a great spot to stock up packaged snack foods. KIND bars, NuGo Free Dark Chocolate Trail Mix protein bars, dried fruit and nuts are some examples. Dehydrated rice noodles, bean soups and gluten-free oatmeal packets are easy to carry along and just require hot water, easy to come across in most hotels, cafés or corner stops. Look for gluten free wraps you can carry along so you can simply request the sandwich fillings be made in your wraps and even bring along plastic gloves just in case. Know that continental breakfasts will unlikely have gluten free breads/cereals and the risk for contamination is likely going to be quite high. Yogurt, cheese, eggs and fresh fruit are good options for breakfast when dining out.

Before booking a hotel, it would be wise to ask if special arrangements can be made depending on your length of stay. Request to have a small refrigerator in your room.  Stock up on inexpensive grab-n-go breakfast food such as gluten free granola bars, dried fruit and rice cakes with a nut butter spread.
 For eating out, research the area beforehand to find those restaurants which will accommodate the gluten-free traveler. Look on the Internet for restaurants which serve gluten-free dishes. Choose those places that understand risk of cross-contamination. –

When ordering here are a few requests you might need to ensure cross-contamination is avoided:

1. Make sure your meat is cooked on a clean surface, meaning not the same grill where bread/buns are toasted.

2. Make sure the vegetables have not been cut on the same cutting board as any flour products.

3. Gluten free pizzas need to be cooked on clean surfaces and gluten free pasta needs to be boiled in clean water, not the same water previously used to cook wheat pasta and the same thing goes for any fry order

4. Tip generously especially if the restaurant or café makes special plates and is very accommodating. This will only encourage similar behavior for the next traveler.

By Country:

Italy: the land of bread, pasta and pizza, is very conducive to the gluten free traveler. The Italian Coeliac Society certifies restaurants claiming gluten-free on their menu to assure the consumer there will be no risk for cross-contamination. Florence is home to several restaurants offering gluten free pasta and there is always the option for a Caprese salad, freshly sliced meats, antipastos and risotto.

France: Many restaurants and bakeries offer gluten-free fare. The Chambelland Boulangerie in Paris is a gluten-free bakery located in the 11th Arrondissement.

Spain: The Attic Restaurant in Barcelona offers selections specific for those with celiac disease. Menu options included pastas, fries, and other gluten-free selections.

A terrific website is www.glutenfreepassport.com for finding info on restaurants, traveling tips, travel language guides and a variety of gluten-free and food allergy apps. Take the time to review it before you embark on your trip. For more specifics by country: if you are traveling to Mallorca, France, Indonesia, Bolivia, Chile, Easter Island, Thailand, Finland, Australia, Montreal, Abu Dhabi, Sweden, Italy, Columbia or Sri Lanka just to name a few, follow this link for stories from gluten-free travelers. http://www.celiactravel.com/stories/

 

Lisa Stollman, MA, RDN, CDE, CDN is the author of the new ebook The Trim Traveler: How to Eat Healthy and Stay Fit While Traveling Abroad (Nirvana Press 2014) and The Teen Eating Manifesto (Nirvana Press 2012.). She is a nationally-recognized Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a specialty in teen and adult weight management and diabetes. Lisa received her B.S. in Food and Nutrition and her M.A. in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She consults with clients in Huntington, New York and on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. To find out more about Lisa or to book an appointment, please visit: http://www.lisastollmanrd.com